Lone Mountain Animal Hospital COVID-19 Update

Last update 4/29/20

A pug has tested positive for COVID 19 and is thought to be the first dog in United States to have tested positive.[7]

Like the dog cases in Hong Kong it is though that the Pug was infected by his owners, three of whom were also positive, and the positive result was considered “mild.”. It is also worth noting that another dog and a cat in same household tested negative.

Two domestic cats have tested positive for COVID 19 in New York.[6] 

These are the first cases of COVID 19 in cats in the United States.

Both cats showed mild respiratory symptoms and are expected to recover. The owner of one of the cats tested had previously tested positive for COVID 19, while it is suspected that the other cat’s owner was asymptomatic.

Previously a cat in Belgium and a cat in Hong Kong tested positive and two dogs tested a weak positive also in Hong Kong.

Recently, a Tiger tested positive for COVID 19 at the Bronx Zoo in New York. It is believed that the Tiger caught the virus from a keeper at the zoo, who was also COVID 19 positive but not showing symptoms.

This latest development for pets and COVID 19 does not really change the CDC’s guidelines, although they have provided additional clarification.[1]

“Until we learn more about this new coronavirus, you should restrict contact with pets and other animals while you are sick with COVID-19, just like you would with people. When possible, have another member of your household care for your animals while you are sick. If you are sick with COVID-19, avoid contact with your pet,”

In addition, the CDC recommends:

“Walk dogs on a leash, maintaining at least 6 feet (2 meters) from other people and animals, do not gather in groups, and stay out of crowded places and avoid mass gatherings. Do not go to dog parks or public places where a large number of people and dogs gather. To help maintain social distancing, do not let other people pet your dog when you are out for a walk.”

There are well over a million people have been tested for positive for COVID 19 and very few domestic pets.

An animal health lab, IDEXX Laboratories, Inc., which has developed a diagnostic test for COVID-19 in pets, released a statement on March 13th that out of thousands of samples from cats and dogs with upper respiratory symptoms none tested positive for COVID-19.[2]

Likewise, Trupanion, a pet insurance company with 500,000 members has seen no uptick in claims for respiratory diseases in pets.[5]

The CDC does NOT recommend testing pets for COVID 19.

The advice from the CDC is that there is no evidence that pets can spread COVID 19 to humans. “At this time, there is no evidence that animals play a significant role in spreading the virus that causes COVID-19. Based on the limited information available to date, the risk of animals spreading COVID-19 to people is considered to be low. A small number of pets have been reported to be infected with the virus that causes COVID-19, mostly after contact with people with COVID-19.”

The doctors and staff, like everyone else, are watching the situation closely. However, our advice and recommendations based on information from the CDC’s website, along with the American Veterinary Medical Association (AVMA) website.[3]

At Lone Mountain, we have made a number of changes to respond to this crisis.

We have temporarily changed our hours to 7AM – 7PM, Monday through Friday, Saturdays 7AM – 5PM, and on Sundays 8AM – 4PM.

We are not allowing clients into the building.

We have instituted curbside-service.

We will collect your pet from you in the parking lot next to your car (please remember your social distance), and we will communicate with you by phone. Payment by credit card will be made over the phone. Please just call us on 702-645-3116, and we will advise you as to each step of the process when you arrive. Our lobby doors will be locked.

Please keep your phone handy and answer blocked calls and text messages during your appointment – that is how we will be communicating with you.

If you have been diagnosed with COVID-19 we ask that you try to have another member of your household bring your pet in.

We have temporarily be suspended our grooming services until further notice.

We are accepting boarders and day boarders on a case-by-case basis.

Thank you for your understanding, and support, during this difficult time. We are making these changes to try and keep both our clients and our staff safe, while still being able to look after pets.

Obviously, this is a very difficult time for everyone.

We take our responsibilities to the pet community in Las Vegas, and the surrounding area, very seriously indeed, just as seriously as we take our responsibilities to our doctors and staff.

The State of Nevada considers veterinarians an essential service…

As per NRS 414.060; NRS 414.070; Declaration of Emergency, Directive 003, March 20, 2020 section 1(a), “Essential Licensed Business” includes essential healthcare operations such as veterinary services.

… so do we.

All of our staff have their temperature checked before starting their shift, and self-check throughout the day.

We have an almost constant cleaning regiment in place throughout the hospital.

Our staff wear masks at all times, both inside and outside of the building.

We have a delivery service for food, medications, and pets.

We also have an online store through our website.

For the moment we are providing routine services, including dentals as part of our dental special. However, if you would prefer not to come in at this time, we will be continuing the dental special to later in the year.

Lone Mountain Animal Hospital has updated our own internal protocols, including cleaning and staff interactions, and we would ask clients to understand if handshakes and hugs are no longer the norm for the time being.

This is obviously a rapidly evolving situation and so things are changing day to day, but our intention is to be there for you and your pet.

[1] https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/faq.html#COVID-19-and-Animals

[2] https://www.idexx.com/en/about-idexx/news/no-covid-19-cases-pets/

[3] https://www.avma.org/resources-tools/animal-health-and-welfare/covid-19/

[5]https://trupanion.com/blog/2020/03/a-fact-first-look-at-covid-19-and-pet-health/

[6]https://www.aphis.usda.gov/aphis/newsroom/news/sa_by_date/sa-2020/sars-cov-2-animals/

[7]https://www.sciencetimes.com/articles/25503/20200428/winston-pug-first-coronavirus-positive-dog-according-research-duke-university.htm

Social Distancing in the Veterinary Hospital

Veterinary services are essential to pet health, overseeing zoonotic health, and ensuring a healthy supply of food. At Lone Mountain Animal Hospital, we are open for business, but with updated protocols to comply with social distancing and to protect both our staff and clients.

We ask that all clients follow these guidelines as they are mandatory, not elective in ensuring public safety and in order for Lone Mountain to be open to provide veterinary services.

  • At LMAH, we are following COVID-19 social distancing guidelines by minimizing close contact between people and maintaining a 3-foot distance.
  • Only one family member is permitted in the exam room. Please have other family members wait in the car. No children are permitted in the hospital.
  • Only one client is permitted in the lobby at a time. We are currently utilizing our “dog” lobby entrance only. A staff member will receive you at the door to take your name and cell phone number.
  • If the lobby is occupied, we will ask you to wait in your vehicle. Once the lobby is clear we will call you to enter the building.
  • When leaving the building please do not return to the lobby, use the exit door located at the left side of the reception desk.
  • If waiting on tests, we ask you to wait in your car. If more time is needed you can go home and we will call when your pet is ready.
  • If your pet has a medical emergency, please alert our staff and you will be escorted into our “cat” entrance.

Please feel free to speak with our team members about any of your individualized needs at 702-645-3116. Thank you for your patronage and assistance during this time.

Lone Mountain Animal Hospital Externship Program: Kristina

Meet Kristina, the newest extern at Lone Mountain Animal Hospital!

Kristina is a fourth-year student at the University of Illinois and will graduate in May this year! Originally from Riverside, California, she attended schools throughout Texas before graduating from Texas A & M University for her Bachelor’s and Graduate degrees. Kristina said ever since she was in kindergarten she’s wanted to be a veterinarian.

“That’s the typical answer,” Kristina said. “But, I kind of solidified the actual [Doctor of Veterinary Medicine] idea when I got to my undergrad.”

Kristina describes her volunteer experience as being “all over the place.” She got her start with rescues, animal shelters, and fosters when she was in middle school and she also volunteered with equine programs for special needs. Since then, Kristina said she’s also volunteered with dog shows, autism awareness places, and bottle baby fostering.

“I’ve probably fostered more than 200 bottle babies in the past five or six years,” she said. “So, that’s my claim to fame in college — everyone knows me as ‘The Bottle Baby Lady!'”

Since finishing her Graduate studies, Kristina said she’s interested in epidemiology and public health. She’s also interested in exotics and zoo medicine, but most of her experience thus far has been in domestic animals. She learned of the externship program at Lone Mountain Animal Hospital from her friend, Dr. Emilee Larkin! After discussing the program with Larkin, Kristina decided to apply and is looking forward to seeing the different aspects of private practice in a different part of the country. She’s also excited to learn more about the niches of exotic animal medicine.

In her spare time, Kristina enjoys continuing her volunteer work with animals and fostering. Kristina has adopted some of the animals she’s fostered. She currently has four cats, a dog, and two African dwarf frogs.

Welcome aboard, Kristina!

Pet Dental Special 2020

Don’t miss out on our 2020 Dental Special starting February 1st, 2020!

Dental health is a very important part of your pet’s overall health! Dental problems can cause, or be caused by, other health problems. Your pet’s teeth and gums should be checked at least once a year to check for early signs of dental disease.

In honor of Dental Season, cleanings have been reduced to $157! But Lone Mountain Animal Hospital is also offering additional chances for savings!

Our Dental Package includes:

FREE Dental Exam

FREE Bath or Bath Voucher

FREE Nail Trim

FREE 30-Day Pet Insurance Trial Offer

*Up to $100 in savings and additional free services!

Click Here to Schedule an Appointment

Dental cleaning prices exclude blood work, x-rays, extractions, and other services. A full estimate will be given at the time of the dental exam or check-in.

Pet Wellness!

Be proactive, not reactive – Pet Wellness Special

 

Be proactive, not reactive – Pet Wellness Special

So, what exactly is pet wellness testing? It’s essentially running lab work at times when our pets appear outwardly healthy. Since symptoms of age and illness aren’t always visible, wellness testing serves as an early warning system to detect abnormalities.

This knowledge is powerful and aids the veterinary team in improving the health and extending the life-expectancy of your pet.If an abnormal trend or disease is detected, it may enable earlier intervention, provide more treatment options, and lead to a more successful outcome.

Wellness testing is essential for dogs and cats over 7 years, but can be valuable for any age pet.

Wellness visit includes a physical exam, a complete blood count (CBC), complete blood chemistry panel, a thyroid level, and a urinalysis. The special price of these services is $209, a savings of over $89. (Please note the wellness special is not applicable for sick pet visits.)

Be proactive about your pet’s health- call for an appointment for a wellness visit today!

 

 

 Special pet wellness exam and bloodwork discount available through the end of September. Discounted exam, cystocentesis, and bloodwork are available for well pets only. Sick pets will require different lab work and diagnostics. 

Pet Dental Special 2019

THIS PROMOTION HAS NOW ENDED!

Don’t miss out on our 2019 Dental Special starting February 1st, 2019!

THIS PROMOTION HAS NOW ENDED!

Dental Cleaning reduced to $155

But wait, there’s more! 

Our Dental Package Includes:

FREE Dental Exam

FREE Bath or Bath Voucher

FREE Nail Trim

FREE 30-Day Pet Insurance Trial Offer

 

*Up to $100 in savings and additional free services!

Click Here to Schedule an Appointment

Dental health is a very important part of your pets’ overall health.  Dental problems can cause, or be caused by, other health problems.  Your pet’s teeth and gums should be checked at least once a year to check for early signs of a problem.  Watch our video for more information.

Dental cleaning prices exclude, blood work, x-rays, extractions, and other services. A full estimate will be given at time of dental exam or check-in.  

Canine Influenza

Canine influenza has been reported in Nevada. There is currently two strains of the dog flu and vaccination is available for both. Both strains are highly contagious, symptoms may or may not be visible until three days of the infection, and an animal can be infectious up to 25 days. Please view our infographic for further clarity on both H3N2 and H3N8 strains and their symptoms. 

 

The Truth about PitBulls

Dr. Jarred of Lone Mountain Animal Hospital explains the origins of Pit Bulls including common misconceptions of the breed. 

The breed originated in the 19th century in England by crossing English Bulldogs and other terriers known as “bull & terriers.” In the 1860’s Pit Bulls were brought the U.S.for use as family guard dogs  and for herding livestock. There are many myths and negative stereotypes surrounding the Pit Bull Breed. Much of this negative press is the result of bias media coverage, and reporting of false non-scientific data and incorrect breed identification. Often, non-pit bull type dogs (mastiffs, other terriers, etc.) are identified as “pit bulls.”

 

So what exactly is a Pit Bull?

Four breeds commonly identified as pit bulls.

   1. American  Stafford Terrier

2. American Pit Bull Terrier

3. Stafforshire Bull Terrier

                                                                                4. American Bully

Pit Bulls were not always so feared by the media or the public, and in 1914-1918 were deemed “America’s dog” and used in World War I to sell war bonds and recruit for the US military. 

 

Where did this negative image of the Pit Bull come from? 

In 1987, a sports illustrated article was written deeming the Pit Bull a “vicious animal” – citing numerous human attacks, referencing their supposed extreme aggression, and inability to be integrated into society.  Taking any emotions you have about this breed out of the equation – if you look at the actual statistics Pit Bulls are not more dangerous than many other large dog breeds. 

  • – There is no such thing as “locking jaws of pitbulls”.  Pit-Bull jaws are anatomically the same as any other breed of dog.  A study was done that showed the average pit bull jaw exerts 235 pounds per square inch, compared to the average for all dogs which is 320 pounds per square inch. – Peer-reviewed statistics conclude that 72% of dog-bite related fatalities were caused by non-pitbull type breeds and mixed-breeds and only ​28% were attributed to all 4 pitbull-type breeds combined.   
  • Peer-reviewed statistics conclude that 72% of dog-bite related fatalities were caused by non-pitbull type breeds and mixed-breeds and only ​28% were attributed to all 4 pitbull-type breeds combined.   
  • – In 2016 the American Temperament Testing Society found that 87% (out of over 900 dogs) of Pit Bulls passed their temperament test.  This is shockingly higher than many other popular breeds like the Collie (58%), Golden Retriever (85%), or Olde English Sheepdog (77%).

Police departments across the country have begun adopting Pit Bulls to become police dogs, A job normally reserved for German Shepherds. Traditional breeds can cost The Police department up to 15K per dog. Officers have begun scouting local shelters seeking Pit Bulls with potential for adoption and proper training. 

While the influence of genetics on certain aspects of a dog’s personality cannot be denied, deeming an entire group of dogs inherently dangerous is simply unfair. This is directly related to the high numbers of pit bulls being admitted to, and euthanized in animal shelters across the country. These are family oriented, loyal, energetic dogs that with proper exercise and training (like any dog) make wonderful companions.  I urge my clients to be responsible owners, regardless of breed, and consider facts versus fiction when choosing the right dog breed for you and your family.

 

Getting your cat to the vet

Dr. Eisenmann of Lone Mountain Animal Hospital explains how to reduce you cats stress preparing for trips to the veterinarian’s office.

 

Like humans, your cat requires annual trips to the doctor for check- ups and preventative care. However, it can be a challenge getting your furry feline to the veterinarian. Because they associate the carrier and journey with stress, most cats do not like coming to the clinic. There are ways to make the trip to the vet a less traumatic and happier experience for all.

This patient is curious and cautious about approaching the cat carrier.

The most common reason kitties get stressed is that they are comfortable with their surroundings and need time to adjust. Typically, cats see their carrier once a year and associate this with a negative and stressful experience. If the carrier is not something your cat sees on a daily basis, he/she will need time to adjust to the new space. Here are some tips on decreasing stress and enhancing your cat’s overall veterinary experience:

  • Place the carrier in a room your cat spends a lot of time in. Fill the carrier with their bedding, favorite toys, and treats
  • Wipe insides of the carrier with a synthetic pheromone such as Feliway® to add calming effects
  • Be patient! It may take your cat several days or weeks to become familiar and comfortable with her carrier.
  • Positive reinforcement. Reward your cat with treats or affection when he/she approaches the carrier so they know it’s a safe place

Sometimes life gets in the way and we can’t plan ahead. Here are some steps to take if your cat needs to get in her carrier should an unexpected illness or emergency occur:

  • Move slowly. Cats can sense tension and stress. If you are calm and collective, your cat will be as well

    Feliway Products sold at Lone Mountain Animal Hospital

  • Place carrier in small room where there is not a lot of hiding places.
  • Encourage your cat with treats and toys.
  • If you’re still having trouble, you may remove the top portion of the carrier or open the top, and gently place the cat inside.
  • Covering the carrier with a towel and/or spraying carrier with a pheromone can also help reduce stress

 

In cases of multi-cat households, coming home from the veterinarian can be challenging as well. Cats smell different to other cats after being to the vet, which can create some tension in the household. Try bringing the cats to the clinic together, since they will all smell like the clinic, it will decrease tension back home.  Try to leave the cat in the carrier when you first arrive home for a minute or so for the others to sniff and get their bearings. If you sense the tension between the cats or have had previous issues, place the cat in another room for a few hours to a day with food, water, and litter. This will allow the cat to adjust and smell like home again. If all goes well and there is no tension, you can let the cat out of the carrier to go on with her day.

The American Association of Feline Practitioners has a great website regarding cat care as well as tips and information on behavior, preventative care, introductions, adoptions and more.

 

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